Top 5 Fantasies Women Want More In Porn

When asked about the differences between what men and women generally want to see in porn, Heidegger explained that it’s “not so binary.” 

“There are some gender differences, but a lot of science, including Lehmiller’s book ‘Tell Me What You Want’ and other research, says cisgendered men and women fantasize about many similar topics,” she said. “The way they interact with these desires may look different, however.”

One of the differences across genders is how much men and women prioritize a narrative in the sexual content they consume. Generally speaking, cis women report caring more about the context, setting and story, Heidegger said. 

“This may be due to estrogen-driven folks having more responsive desire, as opposed to spontaneous desire,” she said. “This is often why many women turn to audio erotica or erotic content made by women.”

Moali agreed that women tend to gravitate toward porn with “narratives that carry emotional depth and context” and “a storyline or character development.” 

Men, however, have historically been drawn to more “visually explicit content,” Moali said, “like videos showcasing different sexual acts.”

“Although the landscape of porn has evolved in the past decade, historically, explicit content has been primarily tailored towards men, lacking emotional depth between characters,” she said.

Another factor to consider: Women may have underlying safety concerns when it comes to sex, which makes backstory more important to their enjoyment, Moali said. 

“Those with past sexual trauma might find it triggering to engage without a relational context, with fears for the safety of all involved hindering their experience,” she said. “Contextual pornography can provide a safer avenue for sexual exploration.” 

When talking about these differences, it’s important to consider the “why” behind them, said Heidegger. Some believe innate gender differences determine what sexual content we’re drawn to, while others acknowledge the role that social and cultural conditioning play “in our beliefs about what is acceptable for us to like,” she said.  

This “can affect what kinds of content or things we interact with — or give ourselves permission to interact with,” Heidegger said.

“In other words, are ‘boys’ just born to love trucks and the color blue? No. Though the research is growing, there is still a greater need for studies that looks at more diverse, cross-cultural LGBTQ+ fantasies and desires.”

This article originally appeared on HuffPost.


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